The 2010 Fully Networked Car workshop

The 2010 Fully Networked Car Workshop organised by the World Standards Cooperation (WSC), a partnership between ISO, IEC, and ITU, was held in early March at the Geneva International Motor Show 2010 and focused on the latest developments in technology and network requirements for electric cars.

For the 5th year running, WSC brought together the key players involved in the development of Standards to present their perspectives and strategies on the current and future role of information and communication technologies (ICT) in motor vehicles.

Among the discussions featured at this year's workshop were the car industry's new challenges and major changes, such as responding quickly and innovatively to the pressures brought about because of the 2008 – 2009 economic crisis and economic, environmental, and societal sustainability.

Today's communication capabilities give cars the potential to foresee and avoid collisions, navigate the quickest route to their destination, make use of up-to-the-minute traffic reports, identify the nearest available parking slot, minimise their carbon emissions, and provide multimedia communications. Environmental concerns have also led to the development of new propulsion, such as hybrid, plug-in, electric, and fuel cell.

In his opening remarks, Rob Steele, ISO Secretary-General, on behalf of WSC, said, 'There is the need for standardisation of essential technologies to provide the solid base for further innovation and the economies of scale for commercialisation of technologies, such as batteries. Most interestingly of all, is the urgent need to consider the interoperability of all of this technology not only in the car, but in the wider infrastructure that is needed to support this revolution.

'For example, not only is there a need for convergence of Standards in batteries, there is also a need for interconnectivity to recharge, service, replace, or recycle these batteries. Standardisation and coordination between vehicle manufacturing, Standards organisations and ICT industries are crucial to the development of new technologies such as this.'

ISO has developed more than 800 Standards for the automotive sector. For example, ISO recently published a three-part Standard, ISO 6469, which provides safety specifications for electrically propelled road vehicles (Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 1: On-board rechargeable energy storage system (RESS) ISO 6469-1:2009; Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 2: Vehicle operational safety means and protection against failures ISO 6469-2:2009; and Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 3: Protection of persons against electric hazards ISO 6469-3:2001).

The long-awaited and much anticipated international Standard for road traffic safety management systems is currently being developed by ISO. The future Road-traffic safety management systems – Requirements with guidance for use ISO 39001 will help improve the migration process of traffic safety technology into vehicles.

A number of NZS and joint AS/NZS Standards are also available for motor vehicles – from seat belts and child restraints, to vehicle alarms and immobilisers, to vehicle components including windscreens and tyres. Among these are the recently revised Methods of testing child restraints AS/NZS 3629:2010, parts 1, 7, 8, and 9.

  • Buy ISO 6469-1:2009 Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 1: On-board rechargeable energy storage system (RESS)
  • Buy ISO 6469-2:2009 Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 2: Vehicle operational safety means and protection against failures
  • Buy ISO 6469-3:2001 Electrically propelled road vehicles – Safety specifications – Part 3: Protection of persons against electric hazards
  • Buy AS/NZS 3629.1:2010 Methods of testing child restraints – Method 1: Dynamic testing
  • Buy AS/NZS 3629.7:2010 Methods of testing child restraints – Method 7: Test for suitability of seatbelt length
  • Buy AS/NZS 3629.8:2010 Methods of testing child restraints – Method 8: Test for suitability of booster seat profile
  • Buy AS/NZS 3629.9:2010 Methods of testing child restraints – Method 9: Test for length of seating surface on a booster seat

(Note – prices subject to change from 1 May 2010)

Published in transport.