Vehicle pedestrian impact new ISO testing Standard to improve pedestrian safety

Issue 33 – November 2011

An ISO Standard that defines a new crash test method will help to reduce pedestrian leg injuries caused by dangerous car design. Road vehicles – Pedestrian protection – Impact test method for pedestrian thigh, leg, and knee ISO 11096:2011provides a test method to assess the protection of an adult pedestrian, by simulating the leg-impact conditions sustained during the car-to-pedestrian crash.

ISO 11096 provides information to consumers on pedestrian safety and helps manufacturers to develop vehicles with excellent pedestrian protection. 'The pedestrian impact test simulates accidents in which a pedestrian is hit by an oncoming vehicle – these accidents represent about 15% of fatal crashes,' says Sukhbir Bilkhu, Chair of the ISO subcommittee that developed the Standard. 'Thanks to ISO 11096, we will make substantial progress in improving vehicle structure, and reducing pedestrian lower-limb injuries.'

The test assesses the most hazardous areas of the bumper, bonnet leading edge, and bonnet of each vehicle model. This is done by firing dummy body parts at those areas, simulating accidents at 16 km/h and 20km/h on an adult pedestrian. The data gathered is assessed using internationally recognised protocols and scores are determined for various parts of the crash test.

You can order PDFs of ISO Standards by calling 0800 782 632 during business hours or emailing enquiries@standards.co.nz.

Published in consumer and occupational safety.