European toy safety directive changes for first time in 20 years and a new BS toy Standard published

11/08/2011

19 August 2011

BS EN 71-1:2011 Safety of toys. Mechanical and physical properties provides detail on the specific requirements of the European Directive on toy safety for mechanical and physical properties. The Directive has been changed for the first time in 20 years. If you produce or market toys for the European market, it's important that you understand the new safety requirements, definitions, and obligations. For example, when a toy is placed on the market, the manufacturer must now draw up an EC Declaration of Conformity. By doing so the manufacturer certifies and assumes responsibility for the compliance of the toy with the essential requirements of the new toy safety Directive.

The new Standard BS EN 71-1:2011 Safety of toys. Mechanical and physical properties covers thespecific requirements of the Directive in relation to mechanical and physical properties. The BS EN 71 series of Standards cover a wide range of toy safety subjects.

BS EN 71-1 can help toy makers reduce the hazards associated with toys. If a toy complies with this Standard, children should be able to play safely with those toys.

You can order PDFs of BS Standards by calling 0800 782 632 during business hours or emailing enquiries@Standards.co.nz.

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